Client project details

UNH - Durham Water System (Durham, NH)

The Project

The UNH/Durham Water System serves the water supply needs of the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and a portion of Durham, New Hampshire. Currently, the Water System relies on withdrawals from the Lamprey and Oyster Rivers and the Lee Well to meet its water demands. A supplementary source of groundwater is being developed in the Spruce Hole Aquifer to meet peak water supply demands during the late summer and fall, while, at the same time, reduce withdrawals from the Lamprey River during periods of low river flows.

Analytical and numerical models of the Spruce Hole Aquifer indicate that the new groundwater Production Well can potentially be pumped at 725 gpm (1,044,000 gpd) for two months of the year under natural recharge conditions (or at 120 gpm [172,800 gpd] year round on a sustainable basis). Pumping of the Production Well at these rates will remove 63 million gallons of water from the Aquifer annually.

Artificial recharge basins are being developed proximal to the Production Well site to allow the UNH/Durham Water System to:

  • Increase the total annual withdrawal of groundwater from the Aquifer;

  • Meet peak water supply demands for longer time periods; and

  • Reduce potential impacts of groundwater withdrawals on existing water resources (including nearby domestic wells and spring flows).

Status/Results:

These benefits will allow the Water System to maximize its capital investment in the development of the new groundwater source, protect existing water resources, and potentially eliminate the need for further groundwater development in the future. In addition, the filtration capacity of the Aquifer has demonstrated that it will naturally treat the Lamprey River water to a degree that it can be classified as groundwater and, therefore, will not require further treatment in the Water System’s surface water treatment plant. As a result, groundwater withdrawals from the Production Well will be managed to lower the annual costs associated with operating the existing surface water treatment plant and will serve to offset the need to expand the surface water treatment plant to meet future water supply demands.

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These benefits would allow the Water System to maximize its capital investment in the development of the new groundwater source, protect existing water resources, and potentially eliminate the need for further groundwater development in the future.

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P.O. Box 1578
56 Main Street
Meredith, NH 03253
T: (603) 279-4425
F: (603) 279-8717
eggi@eggi.com

“Data and research provide the underpinning for sound local water management decision-making that advances the well-being of the nation’s citizens, economy, and environment.”

- National Ground Water Association